Month: December 2016

The finance sector must sign the Paris pact

live mint, Dec 28, 2016

Original link is here

Without increased climate funding to the global South, the poor will end up underwriting a green future for a privileged few

paris-kkn-621x414livemint

The infrastructure gap, global financial sustainability, and a green future are recognized to be common global problems. Photo: Bloomberg


The Paris Agreement on climate action has an Achilles heel: the lack of a buy-in from the financial community. This absent and crucial signatory will need to play a significant role if any ambitious response to climate change has to be achieved.

This is easier said than done. “Sustainability” in financial market jargon has a very different meaning to when it is used in development-speak. In the market, this term largely disregards issues pertaining to employment generation, poverty eradication, inclusive growth and environmental considerations. Instead, it is monomaniacal in enhancing the “basis points” of the returns it generates for the community it serves—with only perfunctory interest in the “ppm (parts per million)” of carbon (mitigated or released) associated with the deployment of finance, or the human development index (HDI) effects of investments.

The regulatory responsibilities and the fiduciary duties that drive the functioning of this community are focused mostly on protecting the interests of investors and consumers (of financial instruments and banking services) by de-risking the financial ecosystem. Together, these present two specific hurdles, both of which make it difficult for the world of money to serve the ambitions of the Paris Agreement. The first hurdle pertains to geography, more specifically political geography. And the second pertains to democracy, more specifically the politics of decision making within institutions that shape and drive global financial flows.

Together, they have deleterious consequences. For instance, the major chunk of climate finance labelled as such finds it tedious to flow across borders. Thus, it is mostly deployed in the locality of its origin. This tendency is even starker for financial flows from the developed world to the developing and emerging world. An Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development—Climate Policy Initiative (OECD—CPI) study found that “public and private climate finance mobilized by developed countries for developing countries reached $62 billion in 2014”. A separate study by CPI estimated that global flow of climate finance crossed $391 billion in the same year—implying that only about 16% of all flows moved from developed to developing countries.

This represents the most significant “collective action problem” that confronts the global community on the issue of climate change. While there is a near universal recognition that a) climate change is a global commons problem, b) the least developed countries are likely to be most affected, and c) significant infrastructure will need to be developed in emerging and developing countries to improve their low standard of living, the flow of money is (not surprisingly) blind to each of these. It recognizes political boundaries, responds to ascribed (and frequently arbitrary) ecosystem risks within these boundaries and flows to destinations and projects that enhance returns—as it was meant to.

The travails of this constrained flow of capital do not end here. In a discussion paper published by the climate change finance unit within the department of economic affairs at the Union ministry of finance, it has been highlighted that even this modest cross-border flow, which also accounts for pledges and promises made, does not adhere to the “new and additional” criteria. Flows of conventional development finance and infrastructure finance are on occasion reclassified as climate finance. And on other occasions these conventional flows are cannibalized to generate climate finance. The size of the pie remains the same.

Unless we are able to increase the total amount of resources available to cater to both the development priorities and climate-friendly growth needs of emerging and developing economies, we may only be able to build a future that is both green and grim. Everywhere, low-income populations will underwrite a green future for a privileged few.

Additional finance for meaningful climate action may be generated by simultaneously working on three fronts as we move to 2020. Successful climate action will first and foremost be predicated on the domestic regulatory framework within each country. Currently, a slew of regulations, from the flow of international finance into the domestic economy to those related to debt and equity markets, disincentivize capital from investing in climate action. It is imperative for policymakers to get their own house in order and create financial market depth and instruments that allow savings to become investible capital even as they continue to demand a more climate-friendly international financial regime.

Second, there currently exists a vast pool of long-term savings—which can be labelled “lazy money”. According to a recent International Monetary Fund report, much of this lies with pension, insurance and other funds, which have accumulated savings of approximately $100 trillion. Due to lack of political will and appropriate mechanisms, this money is neither invested in the climate agreement objectives nor in the sustainable development goals agreed to at the UN last year. This helps nobody. As a result of its inability to flow across borders, developed-world savers earn sub-par returns. And due to this source of finance remaining outside the climate purview, the investment gap in infrastructure, particularly in developing countries, has continued to increase. It now stands between $1 trillion and $1.5 trillion each year. Making this “lazy money” count will be extremely important.

And finally, it is time to bring the big boys controlling banking standards into the tent. The Basel III Accords, designed to create a more resilient international banking system through a suite of capital adequacy, leverage, and liquidity requirements, contribute little to global climate resilience. Given the dependency of emerging economies like India on commercial finance for capital-intensive projects, the Basel Accords need urgent review.

The infrastructure gap, global financial sustainability, and a green future are recognized to be common global problems. But the world cannot continue to solve them on three different tracks. If so, each of them will fail. Only once they are seen as inter-connected can they be addressed effectively.

Samir Saran is vice-president at the Observer Research Foundation.

A reluctant digital power emerges from the shadows

Samir Saran

Earlier this week, the Dutch foreign ministry formally handed the reins of the Global Conference on Cyber Space (GCCS) over to the Indian government, capping a remarkable transformation in New Delhi’s cyber-politik. After being dubbed an outlier democracy that closed ranks with autocratic regimes in Internet governance, India will in 2017 be the first non-OECD country to host the GCCS. The global conference is an outcome of the 2011 “London Process”, set up to foster conversations towards “a secure, resilient and trusted global digital environment”. The GCCS, which has since travelled to Budapest, Seoul and The Hague is easily the biggest global platform of its kind. This process is shepherded by the US, UK and other European partners.

The 2017 iteration is a rite of passage both for the GCCS ­– which is now expected to open itself to a host of southern conversations on digital access and connectivity – and India, which is casting away its image as a reluctant digital power. On this count, New Delhi is now beginning to carve a new partnership with countries that it was earlier reluctant to engage through other collectives like the Non-Aligned Movement or the G-77.

India’s cyber diplomacy is reflective of its own internal transformation. The government appears willing to catalyse economic activity in this sector, engage the private sector (with an unmistakable soft spot for a public sector role as well) and create platforms like Digital India that build on and significantly expand the ambitions of previous national initiatives. New Delhi today aspires to be on the global board of directors who manage the governing architecture of the internet – strengthened by its rich and sometimes noisy debates, vibrant private sector, expanding security capabilities, entrepreneurial potential, and rich diplomatic history.

This story of this transformation began in the summer of 2015, when India understood that “multistakeholderism” was not only a posture of the strong, but also opened possibilities for those who could benefit from the “beyond government” eco-system. That its private sector is yet to seize this initiative fully is another matter. It was also important for India as a democracy to be in the right quadrant of this debate. New Delhi’s willingness to engage the liberal democracies on cyber norms and Internet governance, first as a core interlocutor and now as the host of the GCCS, is a sign of the times to come. The world’s largest democracy is today its fastest growing economy, so there is more than just normative value in the idea of Indian leadership.

An arena like the GCCS lends its host significant discursive space and agenda-setting abilities. The Netherlands used the platform to position itself as a European driver of global conversations on cyber norms, especially around stability. India must do the same. New Delhi can not only carry forward the agenda of the previous rounds but also tailor them for the next 4 billion waiting for access to cyberspace. Questions around affordable connectivity, improved quality of access and data security at the bottom of the pyramid do not serve an ethical endeavour alone; India’s pragmatic business interests are served in an environment where nearly half the world’s population are underserved by the systems and services developed in the West.

The next generation of Internet users in Asia, Africa and Latin America will rely on frugal innovation, open source software, local language computing and scalable enterprise solutions for “smart” cities or villages. These are areas in which India has shown promise or proven leadership. The GCCS should therefore serve as a platform to showcase the transformative potential of the Internet for emerging markets, and what role India can play in aiding this transformation.

The conference allows India to set a forward-looking agenda for the global digital economy, and steer the geo-political discourse on cyber stability that has been vitiated by the spate of serious, transnational electronic intrusions over the last two years.

To enable its effective stewardship of the London Process and the GCCS, India should

1) Develop the maturity to enter into, and entertain, multistakeholder conversations on issues it has normally been averse to broach: these would include offensive cyber norms, the role of the private sector in Internet governance, encryption and data integrity. Regardless of the final Indian “position” on the issue, it is important that New Delhi pays attention to the multiplicity of stakeholders and voices that influence global cyber politics.

2) Create domestic cross-sectoral buy-in to support the London Process as a host, which is a two-year responsibility that is not limited to convening the GCCS. India should go beyond the tactical selling of government programmes and strategically position itself as a global contributor willing to engage on issues that are critical to others. It may well be that the government’s flagship programmes can be replicated in other economies, but India’s private sector and civil society are crucial to fostering institutional linkages that make business and strategic inroads possible.

3) Be inclusive and welcoming to all who engage and seek to partner India as a liberal digital power and digital economy. New Delhi’s Internet diplomacy does not necessarily have to reflect its traditional moorings, because developments in cyberspace will both alter and question fundamental assumptions about global trade and data flows. In the interim, India would do well to invite capital, talent and technology, and nurture a domestic environment where they can flourish. It would be myopic not to recognise the trans-hemisphere connections and their political implications that the GCCS has now brought to bear. New Delhi must confidently pursue its engagement with advanced economies, keeping in mind its own political and economic bottomline.

4) Fashion a “whole of government” approach over the next two years and look beyond the security and ICT ministries. This effort must include other sectors that are digitalising and rely on digital technologies, and marry India’s cyber diplomacy with its economic diplomacy. It must be led by one or two cyber space envoys that India should appoint, formally or otherwise, for the next two years. And it must undertake the process of shaping the GCCS agenda immediately by engaging with as many nations as it can for the process to be inclusive.

India’s hosting of the GCCS and the London Process next year is a chance to consolidate its leadership in foreign policy frontiers like cyber and climate change, where the international regime is not yet on firm ground. New Delhi has demonstrated its willingness to move from the margins to the centre of these debates, but now it is incumbent on the government to build the eco-system that can support its diplomatic leadership. The global conference is an opportunity for India to demonstrate that multistakeholderism is sustainable, even desirable as countries chart out the social contract between their governments, internet companies and end users.

This commentary originally appeared in The Wire.

जलवायु परिवर्तन और मानवाधिकार

Samir Saran|Vidisha Mishra

भारत समग्र रूप से ऊर्जा का दुनिया का चौथा सबसे बड़ा उपभोक्ता है, साथ ही दुनिया का तीसरा बड़ा कार्बन उत्सर्जक देश भी।

जलवायु परिवर्तन मानव अधिकारों पर प्रत्यक्ष और परोक्ष दोनों ही तरह के खतरे पेश कर रहा है। इनमें भोजन का अधिकार, पानी और स्वच्छता का अधिकार, सस्ती व्यावसायिक ऊर्जा हासिल करने का अधिकार और इसे विस्तार देते हुए विकास का अधिकार भी शामिल है। मजबूरी में किए गए व्यापक स्तर पर पलायन, जलवायु से जुड़ी संघर्ष की स्थितियों के खतरे, स्वास्थ्य और स्वास्थ्य व्यवस्था को सीधे और परोक्ष खतरे तथा जमीन और जीविका पर होने वाले प्रभाव, ये मुद्दे दर्शाते हैं कि जलवायु परिवर्तन और मानव अधिकार संबंधी चिंताएं बहुत नजदीक से एक-दूसरे से संबद्ध हैं। सम्मान पूर्वक जीने का अधिकार ही नहीं बल्कि जीवन का अधिकार भी दाव पर है।

जलवायु परिवर्तन की समस्या के मूल में एक अनोखी विडंबना है — जो देश इस समस्या के लिए सबसे कम उत्तरदायी रहे हैं, वे ही इससे सबसे ज्यादा प्रभावित होने वाले हैं। ग्रीनहाउस गैसें विकसित देशों की आर्थिक गतिविधियों की वजह से पैदा हो रही हैं, लेकिन जलवायु परिवर्तन का सबसे ज्यादा बदलाव देखने को मिलेगा गरीब देशों पर। विषम परिस्थिति का सामना करने की बेहतर क्षमता रखने वाले लोगों के मुकाबले वे लोग ज्यादा प्रभावित होंगे जो पहले से समस्याग्रस्त और वंचित हैं। जलवायु परिवर्तन का प्रभाव तो सभी देशों पर होगा, लेकिन यह सबको एक समान प्रभावित नहीं करेगा।

मौजूदा समय में, हर वर्ष होने वाली इंसानी मृत्यु में लगभग एक तिहाई के पीछे गरीबी से जुड़ी वजहें होती हैं। जलवायु परिवर्तन के बढ़ते प्रभाव को देखते हुए यह स्थिति भविष्य में और खराब ही होगी। गरीबों में भी महिलाओं और लड़कियों का अनुपात ज्यादा है जिसकी वजह से वे समस्या की चपेट में और ज्यादा आती हैं। उदाहरण के तौर पर ग्रामीण भारत में, खास तौर पर महिलाओं पर ही यह जिम्मेवारी होती है कि वे खाना और पानी उपलब्ध करवाएं। इसलिए जमीन की पैदावार पर पड़ने वाले जलवायु परिवर्तन के असर, जल की उपलब्धता और खाद्य सुरक्षा का बहुत सीधा असर महिलाओं पर पड़ता है। इसी तरह वर्ष 2004 में आए भूकंप और सुनामी ने दिखाया है कि आपदा के दौरान भारतीय महिलाएं कैसे ज्यादा प्रभावित होती हैं। इस दौरान प्रभावित इलाकों में महिलाएं पुरुषों के मुकाबले चार गुना ज्यादा संख्या में मारी गईं। यह एक उदाहरण है कि जलवायु परिवर्तन किस तरह मौजूदा विषमताओं को और बढ़ाता है। यह भारत के लिए जानलेवा हो सकता है, जहां लैंगिक के साथ ही जातीय और वर्ग संबंधी विषमताएं भी तय करती हैं कि किसी नागरिक को कितने मानवाधिकार हासिल होंगे।

जलवायु पर हो रही अंतरराष्ट्रीय बातचीत में जहां पर्यावरण की रक्षा और आने वाली पीढ़ियों के लिए प्राकृतिक संसाधनों को सहेजने पर जोर होना ही चाहिए, यह भी जरूरी है कि वे दुनिया भर की खतरे की जद में रहने वाली आबादी की तात्कालिक विकास की चुनौती को कतई दाव पर नहीं लगाएं। इसके लिए जरूरी है कि जलवायु परिवर्तन पर हो रही बहस समानता, ऊर्जा तक पहुंच और साझेदारी पर केंद्रित हो। विकास सिर्फ आर्थिक और सामाजिक जरूरत नहीं, यह जलवायु परिवर्तन को ले कर अपनाया गया बेहतरीन उपाय भी है। खतरे की जद में जीने वाली आबादी के जीवन, स्वास्थ्य और जीविका के मौलिक मानवाधिकारों को सुरक्षित रखने के लिए यह जरूरी है कि हम ऐसे विकास को बढ़ावा दें जो चुनौतियों का सामना करने की ऐसे विशेष वर्ग की क्षमता और उनकी संपत्ति को बढ़ा सके और साथ ही जलवायु परिवर्तन के उपायों को भी कामयाबी से लागू कर सके।

दुनिया की सर्वाधिक गरीब 1.2 अरब आबादी के अनुमानित 33% लोगों का ठिकाना भारत है। इस जैसी उभरती अर्थव्यवस्था के लिए खास तौर पर यह बहुत प्रासंगिक है। विकास के अधिकार की रक्षा करना यहां बहुत अहम है क्योंकि यहां यह तथ्य जीवन के अधिकार से जुड़ा है। इस लिहाज से सफल नजरिया वह होगा जिसमें पर्यावरण रक्षा और गरीबी उन्मूलन को पूरी तरह से अलग-अलग लक्ष्य के तौर पर नहीं देखा जाता हो। आप ऐसे ब्रह्मांड की रक्षा किस नैतिकता के आधार पर करेंगे जिसमें एक तिहाई मनुष्य जीवन के चार दशक से ज्यादा नहीं देख पाते, जबकि आबादी का सातवां हिस्सा आठ दशक से ज्यादा का जीवन जीता है।

जलवायु परिवर्तन संबंधी वार्ता में ऊर्जा उत्सर्जन को विकास से अलग रखने के सिद्धांत पर जिस तिव्रता से बात की जा रही है उसमें इस बात का भी खतरा है कि विकासशील देशों में मानवाधिकारों के हनन की आशंका और बढ़ जाए। उत्सर्जन को आर्थिक विकास से ‘पूरी तरह अलग रखने’ की प्रचलित कथ्य की संभावनाओं पर अर्थशास्त्री टिम जैक्सन ने विचार किया है। उनका निष्कर्ष है कि अर्थव्यवस्था के अनुपात में उत्सर्जन की बढ़ोतरी की रफ्तार को थामा तो जा सकता है, लेकिन जब अर्थव्यवस्था विस्तार ले रही हो, उसी दौरान उत्सर्जन को थामना या नकारात्मक विकास की ओर मोड़ना अकल्पनीय है, भले ही कार्बन-बचत तकनीक उपलब्ध हो गई हों।

भारत को अभी अपनी ऊर्जा खपत के चरम पर पहुंचना बाकी है और यह अभी भी प्रति व्यक्ति 2000 वॉट की न्यूनतम जीवनरेखा ऊर्जा उपलब्ध करवाने में संघर्ष कर रहा है। पहली दुनिया के नागरिक वर्ष 2050 में बिना अपने मौजूदा जीवन स्तर को घटाए प्रति व्यक्ति इतनी ही ऊर्जा की खपत कर रहे होंगे (1998 के फेडरल इंस्टीट्यूट ऑफ टेकनालॉजी, ज्यूरिक के अध्ययन के मुताबिक)। शोध बताते हैं कि विकासशील देशों में गरीबी उन्मूलन और जीविका के साधन उपलब्ध करवाने के लिए ऊर्जा तक पहुंच को सुनिश्चित करना आवश्यक है। हालांकि भारत में प्रति व्यक्ति ऊर्जा का उपयोग चीन, अमेरिका या यूरोपीय संघ के मुकाबले बहुत कम है, लेकिन भारत समग्र रूप से ऊर्जा का दुनिया का चौथा सबसे बड़ा उपभोक्ता है और साथ ही दुनिया का तीसरा सबसे बड़ा कार्बन उत्सर्जक देश भी। भारत को स्वच्छ ऊर्जा के एजेंडे पर चलते हुए जलवायु परिवर्तन पर जारी वार्ता में दोहरे लक्ष्य को हासिल करने के नजरिये पर चलना है जिसमें आर्थिक विकास और मानव विकास के लिए ऊर्जा तक पहुंच दोनों शामिल हैं।

विकसित दुनिया के अधिकांश हिस्से को इस बात की चिंता है कि जहां उन्होंने आम तौर पर अपने कोयला उपयोग को हाल के समय (वित्तीय संकट के बाद) में घटाया है, भारत ने इसी दौरान इसके उपयोग को बढ़ाया है। हालांकि विश्लेषण से पता चलता है कि उपयोग में इस बढ़ोतरी को जलवायु के प्रति किसी देश की जवाबदेही से जोड़ कर नहीं देखा जाना चाहिए। बल्कि इस बात पर जोर दिया जाना चाहिए कि प्रति व्यक्ति आधार पर कोयले के दहन में भारत का योगदान अमेरिका के मुकाबले पांचवां हिस्सा भी नहीं। यूरोपीय संघ के मुकाबले यह एक तिहाई है। हम 2050 तक, जब पृथ्वी की अनुमानित आबादी नौ अरब होगी, प्रति व्यक्ति उत्सर्जन को दो टन सीओ2 तक सीमित करना चाहते हैं, ऐसे में हमें व्यक्तिगत ऊर्जा उपलब्धता, कार्बन छूट, इंधन विकल्प और जीवनशैली उत्सर्जन इन सब को सम्मिलित रूप में देखना शुरू करना होगा। यहां हमें जीवनरेखा ऊर्जा और जीवनशैली ऊर्जा के बीच के अंतर पर खास तौर से जोर देना होगा। जीवनरेखा ऊर्जा वह न्यूतन ऊर्जा जरूरत है जिसके आधार पर हम मूल मानवीय जरूरतों को पूरा करते हैं। इसका आकलन जीडीपी विकास दर लक्ष्य और एचडीआई स्तर के साथ ही पूर्व निर्धारित विकास लक्ष्यों को हासिल करने के लिए आवश्यक ऊर्जा की जरूरतों के अनुमान के आधार पर किया जा सकता है। जीवन-रेखा ऊर्जा विकसित देशों के नागरिकों की न्यूनतम जीवनशैली संबंधी जरूरतों को पूरा करने के लिए पर्याप्त होती हैं, उससे ज्यादा ऊर्जा को जीवनशैली ऊर्जा की श्रेणी में रखना होगा। इसलिए भारत भले ही स्वच्छ ऊर्जा की ओर बढ़ने के लिए पुरजोर संघर्ष कर रहा हो, लेकिन अपने औद्योगिक आधार को और अर्थव्यवस्था को बढ़ाने के लिए इसकी कोयले के उपयोग पर निर्भरता लाजमी है। विकास और गरीबी उन्मूलन के बिना भारत नवीकरणीय ऊर्जा या जलवायु परिवर्तन के लिहाज से जरूरी चीजों में निवेश नहीं कर पाएगा। संक्षेप में कहें तो, ‘अगर भारत को सफलतापूर्वक हरित ऊर्जा के लक्ष्य को हासिल करना है तो इसे अपनी कोयला क्षमता को बढ़ाना होगा।’ कार्बन का मौजूदा असमान बंटवारा जलवायु न्याय और हिस्से को ले कर चल रही चर्चा से हमें दूर करता है।

इस साल दिसंबर के दौरान कांफ्रेंस ऑफ पार्टीज (सीओपी) की 21वीं बैठक के दौरान, 193 देश स्वैच्छिक और स्व-निर्धारित राष्ट्रीय लक्ष्य तय कर एक वैश्विक जलवायु समझौता तैयार करने की कोशिश करेंगे। पैरिस में होने वाले समझौते में यह जरूर सुनिश्चित किया जाना चाहिए कि भावी पीढ़ियों के अधिकारों की रक्षा पर इतना ज्यादा ध्यान केंद्रित न हो कि यह विकासशील देशों की खतरे की जद और संकट में रह रही आबादी के जीवन को ही खतरे में डाल दे।

भले ही जलवायु का प्रभाव धीरे-धीरे हमारे लिए सामान्य होता जा रहा हो, लेकिन जलवायु परिवर्तन से होने वाली प्राकृतिक आपदाएं और आत्यांतिक मौसम की घटनाएं पहले से ही उन आबादी पर कहर ढा रही हैं और आने वाले समय में ये और बढ़ने वाली हैं।

इस संदर्भ में अधिकार-आधारित नजरिये के जरिये ‘जिम्मेदारियों, असमानताओं और खतरों का विश्लेषण’ किया जा सकता है और ‘भेद-भाव तथा ऊर्जा के असमान बंटवारे का समाधान’ कर सकती है जैसा कि संयुक्त राष्ट्र मानवाधिकार आयोग ने निर्धारित किया है। यह सुनिश्चित किया जा सकता है कि ऐसी जिम्मेदारियां राज्यों के लक्ष्य और वादे पर लागू हों और इसलिए भविष्य में जलवायु परिवर्तन संबंधी व्यवस्थाएं जलवायु परिवर्तन की वजह से प्रभावित हो सकने वाली आबादी के अधिकारों की रक्षा पर ध्यान दे। यूएनएफसीसीसी की ओर से घोषित विकास के अधिकार की घोषणा में इन मानवाधिकार सिद्धांतों पर जोर दिया गया है और राज्यों की ओर से इन मुद्दों के समाधान पर जोर देता है। इस दौरान उन्हें साझा लेकिन भिन्न-भिन्न जवाबदेहियों और संबंधित क्षमता का ध्यान भी रखना होगा ताकि मौजूदा और भविष्य दोनों की ही पीढ़ियों को लाभ मिल सके।

अब तक बनी हुई भारी असमानता वाली मौजूदा दुनिया में सभी देशों के लिए कम कार्बन वाले, जलवायु-सक्षम और सतत विकास के लक्ष्य को हासिल करना तब तक संभव नहीं है जब तक कि वित्त, तकनीक और क्षमता निर्माण में अंतरराष्ट्रीय सहयोग नहीं हो। इस बात पर भी ध्यान दिए जाने की जरूरत है कि जलवायु परिवर्तन के शमन की तब तक कल्पना नहीं की जा सकती जब तक गरीबी उन्मूलन पर ध्यान नहीं दिया जाए और राष्ट्रों के बीच और उनके अपने अंदर जलवायु न्याय को सुनिश्चित नहीं किया जाए। मानवाधिकारों को जलवायु संबंधी कदमों के साथ जोड़ कर और विकासशील देशों में महिलाओं और बच्चों जैसे सबसे ज्यादा खतरे में रहने वाली आबादी को अधिकार संपन्न बना कर उन्हें जलवायु अनुकूलन और शमन की प्रक्रिया में भूमिका निभाने लायक बनाने से प्रभावों को दूर करने की यह प्रक्रिया काफी तेज हो सकती है। ऊर्जा तक पहुंच सुनिश्चित करना लैंगिक समानता, महिला अधिकार और सबको समाहित करने वाले विकास के लिहाज से भी सहायक होगी।

पेरिस सम्मेलन से पहले भारतीय प्रधानमंत्री ने वैश्विक समुदाय से अपील की है कि वे जलवायु परिवर्तन पर ‘जलवायु न्याय’ को तरजीह दें। गरीबों का कम-उपभोग अमीरों के अधिक-उपभोग के लिए सब्सिडी उपलब्ध नहीं करवा सकता, यह बात देशों के अंदर और विभिन्न देशों के बीच भी एक समान लागू होती है। भविष्य के समझौतों के टिकाऊ और सफल होने के लिए यह जरूरी है कि राज्य बयानबाजी और शक्ति प्रदर्शन से ऊपर उठ कर पर्यावरण संरक्षण के साथ ही जीवन और विकास (बराबर न हो तो समतामूलक ही सही) के अधिकार को भी आगे बढ़ाने की दोहरी जवाबदेही को उठाने को तैयार हों।

यह लेख प्रकाशन ग्लोबल पॉलिसी जर्नल से लिया गया है।

Rethinking the future of Asia: Moving beyond US dominance

Samir Saran| Ashok Malik

Asia will shape the 21st century as much as the Atlantic consensus shaped the 20th century, or Europe the 19th. But to get there, Asia has to pursue a new project, one that begins to create a political Asia.

Like the Atlantic order flourished on the basis of the Bretton Woods and UN systems, Asia needs a reordering of the global landscape. We need a new management, a new board of directors and a new security architecture.

Any usable platforms?

At the very least, this emerging Asian system needs to bring three resident actors (China, Japan and India) and two regional stakeholders (the United States and Russia) to the same table. Other sub-regional influencers should be drawn in as well.

Could the East Asia Summit, of which all these countries are members, serve as a possible platform for such an architecture? Not quite. The East Asia Summit cannot really address the concerns of Central and West Asia.

Alternatively, Ii an expanded mandate for the G20 (seven Asian countries, two more if one were to include Turkey and Russia) the answer? Or do we need to think about a greenfield institution?

Three possibilities

Three possibilities — distinct, but not mutually exclusive — emerge. At the commencement of the 21st century, Asia’s politics resembles the fraught, rudderless multipolarity of the beginning of the 20th.

It took 50 years and two world wars for that reckless order to settle into a multilateral equilibrium.

Asia has to do it better, faster and without the external “stimulus” of a “Great War.” As the dowager power, the United States can incubate new institutional arrangements in Asia, playing Greece to emergent Asia’s Rome, to borrow from Harold Macmillan’s description of the post-war relationship between Britain and the US.

Option 1: India as the bridge power

Should the United States choose to bequeath the liberal international order to Asian powers, India will be the heir-apparent.

However, India would not play the role of a great power, but simply that of a “bridge power.” Asia is too fractious and politically vibrant to be managed by one entity.

India is in a unique and catalytic position, with its ability to singularly span the geographic and ideological length of the continent.

But for that to become a distinct possibility, two variables will need to be determined:

1. Can the US find it within itself to incubate an order in Asia that may in the future not afford it the pride of place like the trans-Atlantic system?

2. Can India get its act together and utilise the opportunity that it has right before it to become the inheritor of a liberal Asia?

Option 2: An Asian “Concert of Nations

The second possibility for a future Asian order is that it resembles the 19th century Concert of Europe. That would mean opting for an unstable but necessary political coalition of major powers on the continent.

The practical result would be that the “Big Eight” in Asia (China, India Japan, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Australia, Russia and the United States of America) would all be locked in a marriage of convenience (one hopes).

To be sure, aligning their disparate interests for the greater cause of shared governance, in one way or another, is a desirable outcome.

Difficult as it would be to predict the contours of this system, it would likely be focused on preventing shocks to “core” governance functions in Asia.

These include the preservation of the financial system, territorial and political sovereignties and inter-dependent security arrangements.

Given that each major player in this system would likely see this merely as an ad hoc mechanism, there is a potential major downside: Its chances of devolving into a debilitating bilateral or multi-front conflict for superiority would be high — very much like the (European) Concert of Nations eventually that gave way to the First World War.

Option 3: Sidelining the US?

A third possibility could see the emergence of an Asian political architecture that does not involve the United States. This system — or more precisely, a universe of subsystems — would see the regional economic and security alliances take a prominent role in managing their areas of interest.

As a consequence, institutions like ASEAN, the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, the AIIB, the Gulf Cooperation Council and the South Asian Association of Regional Cooperation would become the “hubs” of governance.

The United States, for its part, would remain only distantly engaged with these sub-systems. It would be neither invested in their continuity nor be part of its membership.

Which outcome?

Rather than crystal gazing these three possibilities, our objective is to gauge the political underpinnings behind an emerging Asian architecture. Very simply, the question is: Will it be defined by contestation or cooperation?

Quite a bit will depend on the stance of the United States. Can the US incubate a political order that is largely similar to existing multilateral systems? Or will the cost of creating disruptive institutions keep Asian countries from buying into them?

Beyond the U.S. dimension, can any credible pan-Asian governance institution successfully absorb — or at the very least acknowledge — the cultural, economic and social differences that characterize the continent?

Conclusion

The quest for the Asian century is not about finding the Holy Grail of shared governance, but diagnosing the right means to reach a sustainable and inclusive platform.

This commentary originally appeared in The Globalist.

 

जलवायु परिवर्तन और मानवाधिकार

Samir Saran|Vidisha Mishra

भारत समग्र रूप से ऊर्जा का दुनिया का चौथा सबसे बड़ा उपभोक्ता है, साथ ही दुनिया का तीसरा बड़ा कार्बन उत्सर्जक देश भी।

जलवायु परिवर्तन मानव अधिकारों पर प्रत्यक्ष और परोक्ष दोनों ही तरह के खतरे पेश कर रहा है। इनमें भोजन का अधिकार, पानी और स्वच्छता का अधिकार, सस्ती व्यावसायिक ऊर्जा हासिल करने का अधिकार और इसे विस्तार देते हुए विकास का अधिकार भी शामिल है। मजबूरी में किए गए व्यापक स्तर पर पलायन, जलवायु से जुड़ी संघर्ष की स्थितियों के खतरे, स्वास्थ्य और स्वास्थ्य व्यवस्था को सीधे और परोक्ष खतरे तथा जमीन और जीविका पर होने वाले प्रभाव, ये मुद्दे दर्शाते हैं कि जलवायु परिवर्तन और मानव अधिकार संबंधी चिंताएं बहुत नजदीक से एक-दूसरे से संबद्ध हैं। सम्मान पूर्वक जीने का अधिकार ही नहीं बल्कि जीवन का अधिकार भी दाव पर है।

जलवायु परिवर्तन की समस्या के मूल में एक अनोखी विडंबना है — जो देश इस समस्या के लिए सबसे कम उत्तरदायी रहे हैं, वे ही इससे सबसे ज्यादा प्रभावित होने वाले हैं। ग्रीनहाउस गैसें विकसित देशों की आर्थिक गतिविधियों की वजह से पैदा हो रही हैं, लेकिन जलवायु परिवर्तन का सबसे ज्यादा बदलाव देखने को मिलेगा गरीब देशों पर। विषम परिस्थिति का सामना करने की बेहतर क्षमता रखने वाले लोगों के मुकाबले वे लोग ज्यादा प्रभावित होंगे जो पहले से समस्याग्रस्त और वंचित हैं। जलवायु परिवर्तन का प्रभाव तो सभी देशों पर होगा, लेकिन यह सबको एक समान प्रभावित नहीं करेगा।

मौजूदा समय में, हर वर्ष होने वाली इंसानी मृत्यु में लगभग एक तिहाई के पीछे गरीबी से जुड़ी वजहें होती हैं। जलवायु परिवर्तन के बढ़ते प्रभाव को देखते हुए यह स्थिति भविष्य में और खराब ही होगी। गरीबों में भी महिलाओं और लड़कियों का अनुपात ज्यादा है जिसकी वजह से वे समस्या की चपेट में और ज्यादा आती हैं। उदाहरण के तौर पर ग्रामीण भारत में, खास तौर पर महिलाओं पर ही यह जिम्मेवारी होती है कि वे खाना और पानी उपलब्ध करवाएं। इसलिए जमीन की पैदावार पर पड़ने वाले जलवायु परिवर्तन के असर, जल की उपलब्धता और खाद्य सुरक्षा का बहुत सीधा असर महिलाओं पर पड़ता है। इसी तरह वर्ष 2004 में आए भूकंप और सुनामी ने दिखाया है कि आपदा के दौरान भारतीय महिलाएं कैसे ज्यादा प्रभावित होती हैं। इस दौरान प्रभावित इलाकों में महिलाएं पुरुषों के मुकाबले चार गुना ज्यादा संख्या में मारी गईं। यह एक उदाहरण है कि जलवायु परिवर्तन किस तरह मौजूदा विषमताओं को और बढ़ाता है। यह भारत के लिए जानलेवा हो सकता है, जहां लैंगिक के साथ ही जातीय और वर्ग संबंधी विषमताएं भी तय करती हैं कि किसी नागरिक को कितने मानवाधिकार हासिल होंगे।

जलवायु पर हो रही अंतरराष्ट्रीय बातचीत में जहां पर्यावरण की रक्षा और आने वाली पीढ़ियों के लिए प्राकृतिक संसाधनों को सहेजने पर जोर होना ही चाहिए, यह भी जरूरी है कि वे दुनिया भर की खतरे की जद में रहने वाली आबादी की तात्कालिक विकास की चुनौती को कतई दाव पर नहीं लगाएं। इसके लिए जरूरी है कि जलवायु परिवर्तन पर हो रही बहस समानता, ऊर्जा तक पहुंच और साझेदारी पर केंद्रित हो। विकास सिर्फ आर्थिक और सामाजिक जरूरत नहीं, यह जलवायु परिवर्तन को ले कर अपनाया गया बेहतरीन उपाय भी है। खतरे की जद में जीने वाली आबादी के जीवन, स्वास्थ्य और जीविका के मौलिक मानवाधिकारों को सुरक्षित रखने के लिए यह जरूरी है कि हम ऐसे विकास को बढ़ावा दें जो चुनौतियों का सामना करने की ऐसे विशेष वर्ग की क्षमता और उनकी संपत्ति को बढ़ा सके और साथ ही जलवायु परिवर्तन के उपायों को भी कामयाबी से लागू कर सके।

दुनिया की सर्वाधिक गरीब 1.2 अरब आबादी के अनुमानित 33% लोगों का ठिकाना भारत है। इस जैसी उभरती अर्थव्यवस्था के लिए खास तौर पर यह बहुत प्रासंगिक है। विकास के अधिकार की रक्षा करना यहां बहुत अहम है क्योंकि यहां यह तथ्य जीवन के अधिकार से जुड़ा है। इस लिहाज से सफल नजरिया वह होगा जिसमें पर्यावरण रक्षा और गरीबी उन्मूलन को पूरी तरह से अलग-अलग लक्ष्य के तौर पर नहीं देखा जाता हो। आप ऐसे ब्रह्मांड की रक्षा किस नैतिकता के आधार पर करेंगे जिसमें एक तिहाई मनुष्य जीवन के चार दशक से ज्यादा नहीं देख पाते, जबकि आबादी का सातवां हिस्सा आठ दशक से ज्यादा का जीवन जीता है।

जलवायु परिवर्तन संबंधी वार्ता में ऊर्जा उत्सर्जन को विकास से अलग रखने के सिद्धांत पर जिस तिव्रता से बात की जा रही है उसमें इस बात का भी खतरा है कि विकासशील देशों में मानवाधिकारों के हनन की आशंका और बढ़ जाए। उत्सर्जन को आर्थिक विकास से ‘पूरी तरह अलग रखने’ की प्रचलित कथ्य की संभावनाओं पर अर्थशास्त्री टिम जैक्सन ने विचार किया है। उनका निष्कर्ष है कि अर्थव्यवस्था के अनुपात में उत्सर्जन की बढ़ोतरी की रफ्तार को थामा तो जा सकता है, लेकिन जब अर्थव्यवस्था विस्तार ले रही हो, उसी दौरान उत्सर्जन को थामना या नकारात्मक विकास की ओर मोड़ना अकल्पनीय है, भले ही कार्बन-बचत तकनीक उपलब्ध हो गई हों।

भारत को अभी अपनी ऊर्जा खपत के चरम पर पहुंचना बाकी है और यह अभी भी प्रति व्यक्ति 2000 वॉट की न्यूनतम जीवनरेखा ऊर्जा उपलब्ध करवाने में संघर्ष कर रहा है। पहली दुनिया के नागरिक वर्ष 2050 में बिना अपने मौजूदा जीवन स्तर को घटाए प्रति व्यक्ति इतनी ही ऊर्जा की खपत कर रहे होंगे (1998 के फेडरल इंस्टीट्यूट ऑफ टेकनालॉजी, ज्यूरिक के अध्ययन के मुताबिक)। शोध बताते हैं कि विकासशील देशों में गरीबी उन्मूलन और जीविका के साधन उपलब्ध करवाने के लिए ऊर्जा तक पहुंच को सुनिश्चित करना आवश्यक है। हालांकि भारत में प्रति व्यक्ति ऊर्जा का उपयोग चीन, अमेरिका या यूरोपीय संघ के मुकाबले बहुत कम है, लेकिन भारत समग्र रूप से ऊर्जा का दुनिया का चौथा सबसे बड़ा उपभोक्ता है और साथ ही दुनिया का तीसरा सबसे बड़ा कार्बन उत्सर्जक देश भी। भारत को स्वच्छ ऊर्जा के एजेंडे पर चलते हुए जलवायु परिवर्तन पर जारी वार्ता में दोहरे लक्ष्य को हासिल करने के नजरिये पर चलना है जिसमें आर्थिक विकास और मानव विकास के लिए ऊर्जा तक पहुंच दोनों शामिल हैं।

विकसित दुनिया के अधिकांश हिस्से को इस बात की चिंता है कि जहां उन्होंने आम तौर पर अपने कोयला उपयोग को हाल के समय (वित्तीय संकट के बाद) में घटाया है, भारत ने इसी दौरान इसके उपयोग को बढ़ाया है। हालांकि विश्लेषण से पता चलता है कि उपयोग में इस बढ़ोतरी को जलवायु के प्रति किसी देश की जवाबदेही से जोड़ कर नहीं देखा जाना चाहिए। बल्कि इस बात पर जोर दिया जाना चाहिए कि प्रति व्यक्ति आधार पर कोयले के दहन में भारत का योगदान अमेरिका के मुकाबले पांचवां हिस्सा भी नहीं। यूरोपीय संघ के मुकाबले यह एक तिहाई है। हम 2050 तक, जब पृथ्वी की अनुमानित आबादी नौ अरब होगी, प्रति व्यक्ति उत्सर्जन को दो टन सीओ2 तक सीमित करना चाहते हैं, ऐसे में हमें व्यक्तिगत ऊर्जा उपलब्धता, कार्बन छूट, इंधन विकल्प और जीवनशैली उत्सर्जन इन सब को सम्मिलित रूप में देखना शुरू करना होगा। यहां हमें जीवनरेखा ऊर्जा और जीवनशैली ऊर्जा के बीच के अंतर पर खास तौर से जोर देना होगा। जीवनरेखा ऊर्जा वह न्यूतन ऊर्जा जरूरत है जिसके आधार पर हम मूल मानवीय जरूरतों को पूरा करते हैं। इसका आकलन जीडीपी विकास दर लक्ष्य और एचडीआई स्तर के साथ ही पूर्व निर्धारित विकास लक्ष्यों को हासिल करने के लिए आवश्यक ऊर्जा की जरूरतों के अनुमान के आधार पर किया जा सकता है। जीवन-रेखा ऊर्जा विकसित देशों के नागरिकों की न्यूनतम जीवनशैली संबंधी जरूरतों को पूरा करने के लिए पर्याप्त होती हैं, उससे ज्यादा ऊर्जा को जीवनशैली ऊर्जा की श्रेणी में रखना होगा। इसलिए भारत भले ही स्वच्छ ऊर्जा की ओर बढ़ने के लिए पुरजोर संघर्ष कर रहा हो, लेकिन अपने औद्योगिक आधार को और अर्थव्यवस्था को बढ़ाने के लिए इसकी कोयले के उपयोग पर निर्भरता लाजमी है। विकास और गरीबी उन्मूलन के बिना भारत नवीकरणीय ऊर्जा या जलवायु परिवर्तन के लिहाज से जरूरी चीजों में निवेश नहीं कर पाएगा। संक्षेप में कहें तो, ‘अगर भारत को सफलतापूर्वक हरित ऊर्जा के लक्ष्य को हासिल करना है तो इसे अपनी कोयला क्षमता को बढ़ाना होगा।’ कार्बन का मौजूदा असमान बंटवारा जलवायु न्याय और हिस्से को ले कर चल रही चर्चा से हमें दूर करता है।

इस साल दिसंबर के दौरान कांफ्रेंस ऑफ पार्टीज (सीओपी) की 21वीं बैठक के दौरान, 193 देश स्वैच्छिक और स्व-निर्धारित राष्ट्रीय लक्ष्य तय कर एक वैश्विक जलवायु समझौता तैयार करने की कोशिश करेंगे। पैरिस में होने वाले समझौते में यह जरूर सुनिश्चित किया जाना चाहिए कि भावी पीढ़ियों के अधिकारों की रक्षा पर इतना ज्यादा ध्यान केंद्रित न हो कि यह विकासशील देशों की खतरे की जद और संकट में रह रही आबादी के जीवन को ही खतरे में डाल दे।

भले ही जलवायु का प्रभाव धीरे-धीरे हमारे लिए सामान्य होता जा रहा हो, लेकिन जलवायु परिवर्तन से होने वाली प्राकृतिक आपदाएं और आत्यांतिक मौसम की घटनाएं पहले से ही उन आबादी पर कहर ढा रही हैं और आने वाले समय में ये और बढ़ने वाली हैं।

इस संदर्भ में अधिकार-आधारित नजरिये के जरिये ‘जिम्मेदारियों, असमानताओं और खतरों का विश्लेषण’ किया जा सकता है और ‘भेद-भाव तथा ऊर्जा के असमान बंटवारे का समाधान’ कर सकती है जैसा कि संयुक्त राष्ट्र मानवाधिकार आयोग ने निर्धारित किया है। यह सुनिश्चित किया जा सकता है कि ऐसी जिम्मेदारियां राज्यों के लक्ष्य और वादे पर लागू हों और इसलिए भविष्य में जलवायु परिवर्तन संबंधी व्यवस्थाएं जलवायु परिवर्तन की वजह से प्रभावित हो सकने वाली आबादी के अधिकारों की रक्षा पर ध्यान दे। यूएनएफसीसीसी की ओर से घोषित विकास के अधिकार की घोषणा में इन मानवाधिकार सिद्धांतों पर जोर दिया गया है और राज्यों की ओर से इन मुद्दों के समाधान पर जोर देता है। इस दौरान उन्हें साझा लेकिन भिन्न-भिन्न जवाबदेहियों और संबंधित क्षमता का ध्यान भी रखना होगा ताकि मौजूदा और भविष्य दोनों की ही पीढ़ियों को लाभ मिल सके।

अब तक बनी हुई भारी असमानता वाली मौजूदा दुनिया में सभी देशों के लिए कम कार्बन वाले, जलवायु-सक्षम और सतत विकास के लक्ष्य को हासिल करना तब तक संभव नहीं है जब तक कि वित्त, तकनीक और क्षमता निर्माण में अंतरराष्ट्रीय सहयोग नहीं हो। इस बात पर भी ध्यान दिए जाने की जरूरत है कि जलवायु परिवर्तन के शमन की तब तक कल्पना नहीं की जा सकती जब तक गरीबी उन्मूलन पर ध्यान नहीं दिया जाए और राष्ट्रों के बीच और उनके अपने अंदर जलवायु न्याय को सुनिश्चित नहीं किया जाए। मानवाधिकारों को जलवायु संबंधी कदमों के साथ जोड़ कर और विकासशील देशों में महिलाओं और बच्चों जैसे सबसे ज्यादा खतरे में रहने वाली आबादी को अधिकार संपन्न बना कर उन्हें जलवायु अनुकूलन और शमन की प्रक्रिया में भूमिका निभाने लायक बनाने से प्रभावों को दूर करने की यह प्रक्रिया काफी तेज हो सकती है। ऊर्जा तक पहुंच सुनिश्चित करना लैंगिक समानता, महिला अधिकार और सबको समाहित करने वाले विकास के लिहाज से भी सहायक होगी।

पेरिस सम्मेलन से पहले भारतीय प्रधानमंत्री ने वैश्विक समुदाय से अपील की है कि वे जलवायु परिवर्तन पर ‘जलवायु न्याय’ को तरजीह दें। गरीबों का कम-उपभोग अमीरों के अधिक-उपभोग के लिए सब्सिडी उपलब्ध नहीं करवा सकता, यह बात देशों के अंदर और विभिन्न देशों के बीच भी एक समान लागू होती है। भविष्य के समझौतों के टिकाऊ और सफल होने के लिए यह जरूरी है कि राज्य बयानबाजी और शक्ति प्रदर्शन से ऊपर उठ कर पर्यावरण संरक्षण के साथ ही जीवन और विकास (बराबर न हो तो समतामूलक ही सही) के अधिकार को भी आगे बढ़ाने की दोहरी जवाबदेही को उठाने को तैयार हों।

यह लेख प्रकाशन ग्लोबल पॉलिसी जर्नल से लिया गया है।